The economic consequences of reproductive health and family planning

@article{Canning2012TheEC,
  title={The economic consequences of reproductive health and family planning},
  author={D. Canning and T. Schultz},
  journal={The Lancet},
  year={2012},
  volume={380},
  pages={165-171}
}
We consider the evidence for the effect of access to reproductive health services on the achievement of Millennium Development Goals 1, 2, and 3, which aim to eradicate extreme poverty and hunger, achieve universal primary education, and promote gender equality and empower women. At the household level, controlled trials in Matlab, Bangladesh, and Navrongo, Ghana, have shown that increasing access to family planning services reduces fertility and improves birth spacing. In the Matlab study… Expand
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