The ecology of carnivore social behaviour

@article{Macdonald1983TheEO,
  title={The ecology of carnivore social behaviour},
  author={David W. Macdonald},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1983},
  volume={301},
  pages={379-384}
}
Diverse selective pressures have contributed to the evolution of the varied social groups of carnivores: the benefits of strength of numbers for defence of kills and territory, and in the hunting and killing of large prey; the ability to intimidate predators and to be vigilant against their approaches; the potential for information transfer and social learning, and a suite of alloparental behaviour patterns. Each of these may operate within the constraints upon group size and home range size… Expand
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