The early history of pterosaur discovery in Great Britain

@inproceedings{Martill2010TheEH,
  title={The early history of pterosaur discovery in Great Britain},
  author={David M. Martill},
  year={2010}
}
  • D. Martill
  • Published 2010
  • History, Geography, Environmental Science
Abstract The first pterosaur fossil was described by Cosimo Alessandro Collini in 1784, but the epithet ptero dactyle was not applied until Georges Cuvier recognized the fossil as that of a volant animal in 1801. In eighteenth-century Britain, pterosaur bones had been discovered in Jurassic strata at Stonesfield, Oxfordshire but were considered to be bird bones, and largely went unnoticed. Bones of pterosaurs considerably larger than those of the first pterosaurs were discovered in the early… 
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Pteranodon and beyond: the history of giant pterosaurs from 1870 onwards
  • M. Witton
  • Geography, Environmental Science
  • 2010
Abstract The immense size of many pterosaurs is now well known to academics and laymen alike, but truly enormous forms with wingspans more than twice those of the largest modern birds were not
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