The early diversification of ray-finned fishes (Actinopterygii): hypotheses, challenges and future prospects

@inproceedings{Henderson2021TheED,
  title={The early diversification of ray-finned fishes (Actinopterygii): hypotheses, challenges and future prospects},
  author={Struan Henderson and Emma M. Dunne and Sam Giles},
  year={2021}
}
Actinopterygii are the most speciose living vertebrate clade, and study of fossil members during their Palaeozoic rise to dominance has a long history of descriptive work. Although research interest into Palaeozoic actinopterygians has increased in recent years, broader patterns of diversity and diversity dynamics remain critically understudied. Past studies have investigated macroevolutionary trends in Palaeozoic actinopterygians in a piecemeal fashion, variably using existing compendia of… 
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High lineage survivorship across the end-Devonian Mass Extinction suggested by a remarkable new Late Devonian actinopterygian
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