The earliest primates

@article{Rose2005TheEP,
  title={The earliest primates},
  author={Kenneth D. Rose},
  journal={Evolutionary Anthropology: Issues},
  year={2005},
  volume={3}
}
  • K. Rose
  • Published 2 June 2005
  • Geography
  • Evolutionary Anthropology: Issues
Remarkable new fossil discoveries and intensive study of fossil evidence has led, during the past decade, and particularly the last few years, to exceptional advances and modifications in our understanding of early primate evolution. New insights have also come from research on extant primates, especially detailed anatomical, functional, and molecular studies. This review, however, focuses on the paleontological evidence. New fossils are spawning novel, sometimes controversial ideas about the… 
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