The dyadic nature of bullying and victimization: testing a dual-perspective theory.

Abstract

For this study, information on Who Bullies Who was collected from 54 school classes with 918 children (M age = 11) and 13,606 dyadic relations. Bullying and victimization were viewed separately from the point of view of the bully and the victim. The two perspectives were highly complementary. The probability of a bully-victim relationship was higher if the bully was more dominant than the victim, and if the victim was more vulnerable than the bully and more rejected by the class. In a bully-victim dyad, boys were more often the bullies. There was no finding of sex effect for victimization. Liking reduced and disliking increased the probability of a bully-victim relationship.

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@article{Veenstra2007TheDN, title={The dyadic nature of bullying and victimization: testing a dual-perspective theory.}, author={Ren{\'e} Veenstra and Siegwart M. Lindenberg and Bonne J. H. Zijlstra and Andrea F. de Winter and Frank C. Verhulst and Johan H Ormel}, journal={Child development}, year={2007}, volume={78 6}, pages={1843-54} }