The draft genomes of soft–shell turtle and green sea turtle yield insights into the development and evolution of the turtle–specific body plan

@article{Wang2013TheDG,
  title={The draft genomes of soft–shell turtle and green sea turtle yield insights into the development and evolution of the turtle–specific body plan},
  author={Zhuoming Wang and Juan Pascual-Anaya and A. Zadissa and Wenqi Li and Y. Niimura and Zhiyong Huang and Chunyi Li and S. White and Z. Xiong and Dongming Fang and Bo Wang and Y. Ming and Y. Chen and Yuan Zheng and S. Kuraku and M. Pignatelli and Javier Herrero and Kathryn Beal and M. Nozawa and Qiye Li and Juan Wang and Hongyan Zhang and Lili Yu and S. Shigenobu and Junyi Wang and Jiannan Liu and P. Flicek and S. Searle and J. Wang and S. Kuratani and Ye Yin and Bronwen L. Aken and Guojie Zhang and Naoki Irie},
  journal={Nature genetics},
  year={2013},
  volume={45},
  pages={701 - 706}
}
The unique anatomical features of turtles have raised unanswered questions about the origin of their unique body plan. We generated and analyzed draft genomes of the soft-shell turtle (Pelodiscus sinensis) and the green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas); our results indicated the close relationship of the turtles to the bird-crocodilian lineage, from which they split ∼267.9–248.3 million years ago (Upper Permian to Triassic). We also found extensive expansion of olfactory receptor genes in these… Expand

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