The downside of open-access publishing.

@article{Haug2013TheDO,
  title={The downside of open-access publishing.},
  author={Charlotte J Haug},
  journal={The New England journal of medicine},
  year={2013},
  volume={368 9},
  pages={
          791-3
        }
}
  • C. Haug
  • Published 27 February 2013
  • Economics
  • The New England journal of medicine
The open-access model in which authors pay to have their work published offers an alternative way of financing quality control in scholarly publishing. But it also opens up opportunities for unscrupulous online “vanity presses” to exploit authors for profit. 

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Predatory Publishing, Questionable Peer Review, and Fraudulent Conferences

  • J. D. Bowman
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Open-access is a model for publishing scholarly, peer-reviewed journals on the Internet that relies on sources of funding other than subscription fees. Some publishers and editors have exploited the
...

References

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Open but not free--publishing in the 21st century.

  • Marti Frank
  • Political Science
    The New England journal of medicine
  • 2013
Online dissemination served as the impetus for the open-access movement and the call for free dissemination of the information contained in journals. There is, however, a cost associated with this

Predatory publishers are corrupting open access

  • J. Beall
  • Political Science, Medicine
    Nature
  • 2012

Creative Commons and the openness of open access.

As part of the open-access movement and with the mission of expanding the terms of use for increasingly accessible information, Creative Commons has produced six copyright licenses that permit a

For the sake of inquiry and knowledge--the inevitability of open access.

  • Ann Wolpert
  • Education
    The New England journal of medicine
  • 2013
Many stakeholders in the scholarly communication system have cause to seek broader access to information and are experimenting with more open, Internet-based alternatives to traditional publishing.