The double helix and the 'wronged heroine'

@article{Maddox2003TheDH,
  title={The double helix and the 'wronged heroine'},
  author={Brenda Maddox},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2003},
  volume={421},
  pages={407-408}
}
In 1962, James Watson, Francis Crick and Maurice Wilkins received the Nobel prize for the discovery of the structure of DNA. Notably absent from the podium was Rosalind Franklin, whose X-ray photographs of DNA contributed directly to the discovery of the double helix. Franklin's premature death, combined with misogynist treatment by the male scientific establishment, cast her as a feminist icon. This myth overshadowed her intellectual strength and independence both as a scientist and as an… 
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A draft manuscript shows how near Rosalind Franklin came to finding the correct structure of DNA.
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