The dopamine theory of addiction: 40 years of highs and lows

@article{Nutt2015TheDT,
  title={The dopamine theory of addiction: 40 years of highs and lows},
  author={David J. Nutt and Anne Lingford-Hughes and David Erritzoe and Paul R. A. Stokes},
  journal={Nature Reviews Neuroscience},
  year={2015},
  volume={16},
  pages={305-312}
}
For several decades, addiction has come to be viewed as a disorder of the dopamine neurotransmitter system; however, this view has not led to new treatments. In this Opinion article, we review the origins of the dopamine theory of addiction and discuss the ability of addictive drugs to elicit the release of dopamine in the human striatum. There is robust evidence that stimulants increase striatal dopamine levels and some evidence that alcohol may have such an effect, but little evidence, if any… 
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