• Corpus ID: 23335809

The doctrine of signatures in the medieval and Ottoman Levant.

@article{Lev2002TheDO,
  title={The doctrine of signatures in the medieval and Ottoman Levant.},
  author={Efraim Lev},
  journal={Vesalius : acta internationales historiae medicinae},
  year={2002},
  volume={8 1},
  pages={
          13-22
        }
}
  • E. Lev
  • Published 30 May 2002
  • Medicine
  • Vesalius : acta internationales historiae medicinae
This study traces the use of the Doctrine of Signatures among medieval and Ottoman physicians and its subsequent appearance in the pharmacological literature of the Levant. Close examination of the historical sources of the Levant seems to support the claim that although this theory did not originate in the region, it was certainly practised there. These sources have revealed 23 substances with medicinal uses based on the Doctrine, bearing witness to the extent of its influence at the time. The… 

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