The divided eye of the isopod Glyptonotus antarcticus : effects of unilateral dark adaptation and temperature elevation

@article{MeyerRochow1982TheDE,
  title={The divided eye of the isopod Glyptonotus antarcticus : effects of unilateral dark adaptation and temperature elevation},
  author={V. Meyer-Rochow},
  journal={Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B. Biological Sciences},
  year={1982},
  volume={215},
  pages={433 - 450}
}
  • V. Meyer-Rochow
  • Published 1982
  • Biology
  • Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B. Biological Sciences
The literature on the structure and function of isopod compound eyes is briefly reviewed. Unlike other isopods studied, Glyptonotus antarcticus possesses physically separated large dorsal compound eyes and small ventral compound eyes. G. antarcticus turns upside down when it swims, and it seems that this is when the ventrally located eyes become useful. Structurally, the two types of eye are very similar : both consist of individual ommatidia, which in an adult specimen can be 80–100 μm wide… Expand

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