The distribution of grooming and related behaviours among adult female vervet monkeys

@article{Seyfarth1980TheDO,
  title={The distribution of grooming and related behaviours among adult female vervet monkeys},
  author={Robert M. Seyfarth},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={1980},
  volume={28},
  pages={798-813}
}
Abstract Grooming and related behaviours among adult females in three groups of vervet monkeys were studied for 14 months. In all groups, high rates of grooming were significantly correlated with high rates of alliance formation and/or proximity. Females of all ranks competed more for the opportunity to groom high-ranking, as opposed to low-ranking, individuals. High-ranking females received more grooming than others and, at least partly as a result of competition, 16 of 23 females gave more… Expand
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Allogrooming Behavior and Grooming Site Preferences in Captive Bonobos (Pan paniscus): Association with Female Dominance
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  • Psychology
  • International Journal of Primatology
  • 2004
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TLDR
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TLDR
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