The distinctiveness of the word-length effect.

@article{Hulme2006TheDO,
  title={The distinctiveness of the word-length effect.},
  author={Charles Hulme and Ian Neath and George Stuart and Lisa Shostak and Aim{\'e}e M. Surprenant and Gordon D. A. Brown},
  journal={Journal of experimental psychology. Learning, memory, and cognition},
  year={2006},
  volume={32 3},
  pages={586-94}
}
The authors report 2 experiments that compare the serial recall of pure lists of long words, pure lists of short words, and lists of long or short words containing just a single isolated word of a different length. In both experiments for pure lists, there was a substantial recall advantage for short words; the isolated words were recalled better than other words in the same list, and there was a reverse word-length effect: Isolated long words were recalled better than isolated short words… CONTINUE READING