The discovery of CRISPR in archaea and bacteria

@article{Mojica2016TheDO,
  title={The discovery of CRISPR in archaea and bacteria},
  author={Francisco J. M. Mojica and Francisco Rodr{\'i}guez-Valera},
  journal={The FEBS Journal},
  year={2016},
  volume={283}
}
CRISPR‐Cas are self‐/nonself‐discriminating systems found in prokaryotic cells. They represent a remarkable example of molecular memory that is hereditarily transmitted. Their discovery can be considered as one of the first fruits of the systematic exploration of prokaryotic genomes. Although this genomic feature was serendipitously discovered in molecular biology studies, it was the availability of multiple complete genomes that shed light about their role as a genetic immune system. Here we… 
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