The dire implications of releasing marine ornamental fishes into the wild: first reported case from the Red Sea

@article{Stern2016TheDI,
  title={The dire implications of releasing marine ornamental fishes into the wild: first reported case from the Red Sea},
  author={Nir Stern and Elad Nehoray Rachmilovitz and Galit Sharon and Ariel Diamant},
  journal={Marine Biodiversity},
  year={2016},
  volume={48},
  pages={1615-1620}
}
This study provides the first documented incidence of aquarium-based introduction of exotic fishes into the Red Sea, in the Coral Beach Nature Reserve in Eilat, Israel. A clown triggerfish Balistoides conspicillum and a queen angelfish Holacanthus ciliaris were sighted inside the marine protected area, then captured and examined, and Photobacterium damselae ssp. piscicida was isolated from the kidney of H. ciliaris. This is the causative agent of “fish pasteurellosis”, which has been… 
1 Citations
New records of Plotosus japonicus in the Red Sea and genetic indications for its presence throughout the Indo-Pacific (Osteichthyes: Plotosidae)
TLDR
Molecular comparisons of this population of striped eel catfish with previously published samples show that this species is actually present throughout the Indo-Pacific and provide indication that this genus includes two of ambiguous identity species that await further examinations.

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 32 REFERENCES
A hotspot of non-native marine fishes: evidence for the aquarium trade as an invasion pathway
Invasions of non-native species in marine ecosystems can be ecologically damaging and economically costly. Identifying 'hot-spots' of non-native species and their sources of introduction is necessary
The Aquarium Trade as an Invasion Pathway in the Pacific Northwest
TLDR
The first investigation of the ornamental pet trade as an invasion pathway in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States, where a moderate climate and a large human population present ample opportunities for the introduction and establishment of aquarium trade species is reported.
From ocean to aquarium: the global trade in marine ornamental species
TLDR
From Ocean to Aquarium presents a brief overview of how the trade functions and the impacts it has on coral reefs, as well as on the human communities that derive an income from trading in marine ornamental species.
Assessing the Risk of Introducing Exotic Species via the Live Marine Species Trade
TLDR
To prevent future marine invasions, better reporting requirements for live species imports are needed, and best-management practices and outreach strategies specific to the transfer mechanism should be developed and implemented.
Beyond ballast water: aquarium and ornamental trades as sources of invasive species in aquatic ecosystems
Although ballast water has received much attention as a source of aquatic invasive species, aquariums and trade in aquarium and ornamental species are emerging as another important source for species
Investigation of ornamental fish entering the EU for the presence of ranaviruses.
TLDR
The results suggest that ranaviruses are not highly prevalent in ornamental fish imported into the EU, as compared with other viral agents belonging to the genus Ranavirus.
EUROPEAN HUB FOR INVADERS: RISK ASSESSMENT OF FRESHWATER AQUARIUM FISHES EXPORTED FROM THE CZECH REPUBLIC
TLDR
The risk potential of aquarium species most traded in the EU seems to be not alarming, and attention should be focused on the possibility of novel pathogen transfer to native aquatic biota as an important aspect of regulating the aquarium trade.
Host introduction and parasites: a case study on the parasite community of the peacock grouper Cephalopholis argus (Serranidae) in the Hawaiian Islands
TLDR
This study provides the first field evidence of significant parasite release in a wild but previously introduced fish in coral reefs and is discussed in relation to the Enemy-Release Hypothesis which has never been assessed in those ecosystems.
The aquarium trade as a potential source of fish introductions in southwestern Europe
TLDR
The results imply that frequency in the trade varies strongly among species and commerce types and although general pet stores have usually low diversity, this is compensated with a higher species turnover.
...
...