The different representational frameworks underpinning abstract and concrete knowledge: evidence from odd-one-out judgements.

@article{Crutch2009TheDR,
  title={The different representational frameworks underpinning abstract and concrete knowledge: evidence from odd-one-out judgements.},
  author={Sebastian J. Crutch and Sarah Connell and Elizabeth K. Warrington},
  journal={Quarterly journal of experimental psychology},
  year={2009},
  volume={62 7},
  pages={
          1377-88, 1388-90
        }
}
Recent evidence from neuropsychological investigations of individuals with global aphasia and deep or deep-phonological dyslexia suggests that abstract and concrete concepts are underpinned by qualitatively different representational frameworks. Abstract words are represented primarily by their association to other words, whilst concrete words are represented primarily by their taxonomic similarity to one another. In the current study, we present the first evidence for this association… CONTINUE READING
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