The diagnosis of mental disorders: the problem of reification.

@article{Hyman2010TheDO,
  title={The diagnosis of mental disorders: the problem of reification.},
  author={Steven E. Hyman},
  journal={Annual review of clinical psychology},
  year={2010},
  volume={6},
  pages={
          155-79
        }
}
  • S. Hyman
  • Published 24 March 2010
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Annual review of clinical psychology
A pressing need for interrater reliability in the diagnosis of mental disorders emerged during the mid-twentieth century, prompted in part by the development of diverse new treatments. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), third edition answered this need by introducing operationalized diagnostic criteria that were field-tested for interrater reliability. Unfortunately, the focus on reliability came at a time when the scientific understanding of mental disorders was… 

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