The diagnosis and management of tinea

@article{Moriarty2012TheDA,
  title={The diagnosis and management of tinea},
  author={Bl{\'a}ith{\'i}n Moriarty and Roderick James Hay and Rachael Morris-Jones},
  journal={BMJ : British Medical Journal},
  year={2012},
  volume={345}
}
#### Summary points. [] Key Method#### Sources and selection criteria We based this review on a detailed review of English language publications. We also drew on the British Association of Dermatologists’ clinical guidelines for the management of tinea capitis and the management of onychomycosis, Health Protection Agency guidelines, and extensive clinical experience. All three genera of dermatophytes grow in keratinised environments such as hair, skin, and nails.4 Anthropophilic dermatophytes are…
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