The development of joint attention in blind infants

@article{Bigelow2003TheDO,
  title={The development of joint attention in blind infants},
  author={Ann E. Bigelow},
  journal={Development and Psychopathology},
  year={2003},
  volume={15},
  pages={259 - 275}
}
  • A. Bigelow
  • Published 2003
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Development and Psychopathology
There is little documentation of how and when joint attention emerges in blind infants because the study of this ability has been predominantly reliant on visual information. Ecological self-knowledge, which is necessary for joint attention, is impaired in blind infants and is evidenced by their reaching for objects on external cues, which also marks the beginning of their Stage 4 understanding of space and object. Entry into Stage 4 should occur before joint attention emerges in these infants… Expand

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