The development of face perception in infancy: intersensory interference and unimodal visual facilitation.

@article{Bahrick2013TheDO,
  title={The development of face perception in infancy: intersensory interference and unimodal visual facilitation.},
  author={Lorraine E. Bahrick and Robert Lickliter and Irina Castellanos},
  journal={Developmental psychology},
  year={2013},
  volume={49 10},
  pages={
          1919-30
        }
}
Although research has demonstrated impressive face perception skills of young infants, little attention has focused on conditions that enhance versus impair infant face perception. The present studies tested the prediction, generated from the intersensory redundancy hypothesis (IRH), that face discrimination, which relies on detection of visual featural information, would be impaired in the context of intersensory redundancy provided by audiovisual speech and enhanced in the absence of… 

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