The determinants of successful self-catheterization programs in children with myelomeningoceles.

Abstract

Myelomeningocele is a birth defect that results in lifelong consequences for the child and family. One of the abnormalities that results from the defect is a neurogenic bladder. Most children with myelomeningoceles will require a clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) program for continence. Yet, many children do not have success with these programs. The purpose of this report is to identify in the literature components of a successful self-catheterization program. The importance of proper urinary management in children with myelomeningoceles will be discussed. Physiological, developmental, and motivational qualities that are present in successful self-catheterization programs will be identified. The importance of knowing when the child is ready to learn, how to know when the child is ready to learn, and different styles of teaching self-catheterization will be discussed. Finally, nursing implications for children on CIC programs will be described.

Cite this paper

@article{Segal1995TheDO, title={The determinants of successful self-catheterization programs in children with myelomeningoceles.}, author={Ella Shtifman Segal and Janet A. Deatrick and N A Hagelgans}, journal={Journal of pediatric nursing}, year={1995}, volume={10 2}, pages={82-8} }