The defensive response of the honeybee Apis mellifera

@article{Nouvian2016TheDR,
  title={The defensive response of the honeybee Apis mellifera},
  author={Morgane Nouvian and Judith Reinhard and Martin Giurfa},
  journal={Journal of Experimental Biology},
  year={2016},
  volume={219},
  pages={3505 - 3517}
}
ABSTRACT Honeybees (Apis mellifera) are insects living in colonies with a complex social organization. Their nest contains food stores in the form of honey and pollen, as well as the brood, the queen and the bees themselves. These resources have to be defended against a wide range of predators and parasites, a task that is performed by specialized workers, called guard bees. Guards tune their response to both the nature of the threat and the environmental conditions, in order to achieve an… 

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