The dawn of symbiosis between plants and fungi

@article{Bidartondo2011TheDO,
  title={The dawn of symbiosis between plants and fungi},
  author={Martin I. Bidartondo and David J. Read and James M. Trappe and Vincent Sft Merckx and Roberto Ligrone and Jeffrey G. Duckett},
  journal={Biology Letters},
  year={2011},
  volume={7},
  pages={574 - 577}
}
The colonization of land by plants relied on fundamental biological innovations, among which was symbiosis with fungi to enhance nutrient uptake. Here we present evidence that several species representing the earliest groups of land plants are symbiotic with fungi of the Mucoromycotina. This finding brings up the possibility that terrestrialization was facilitated by these fungi rather than, as conventionally proposed, by members of the Glomeromycota. Since the 1970s it has been assumed… Expand
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