The dangers of inferring treatment effects from observational data: a case study in HIV infection.

Abstract

Several recent articles have implicitly questioned the need for randomized controlled trials, based on a comparison of treatment effects from observational studies and related randomized controlled trials. We present here a counterexample of a comparison of two antiretroviral drugs used in the treatment of HIV infection, in which the observational analysis gave a potentially misleading result. Examples such as this emphasize the need to regard randomized controlled trials as the primary mechanism for assessing therapeutic efficacy.

Statistics

0204060'03'05'07'09'11'13'15'17
Citations per Year

65 Citations

Semantic Scholar estimates that this publication has 65 citations based on the available data.

See our FAQ for additional information.

Cite this paper

@article{Dunn2002TheDO, title={The dangers of inferring treatment effects from observational data: a case study in HIV infection.}, author={David T. Dunn and Abdel G. Babiker and Malcolm H Hooker and Janet H Darbyshire}, journal={Controlled clinical trials}, year={2002}, volume={23 2}, pages={106-10} }