The cytoskeletal mechanics of brain morphogenesis

@article{Gordon2007TheCM,
  title={The cytoskeletal mechanics of brain morphogenesis},
  author={Richard Gordon and G. Wayne Brodland},
  journal={Cell Biophysics},
  year={2007},
  volume={11},
  pages={177-238}
}
There is a functional device in embryonic ectodermal cells that we propose causes them to differentiate into either neuroepithelial or epidermal tissue during the process called primary neural induction. We call this apparatus the “cell state splitter”. Its main components are the apical microfilament ring and the coplanar apical mat of microtubules, which exert forces in opposite radial directions. We analyze the mechanical interaction between these cytoskeletal components and show that they… Expand
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