The cumulative cost of additional wakefulness: dose-response effects on neurobehavioral functions and sleep physiology from chronic sleep restriction and total sleep deprivation.

@article{VanDongen2003TheCC,
  title={The cumulative cost of additional wakefulness: dose-response effects on neurobehavioral functions and sleep physiology from chronic sleep restriction and total sleep deprivation.},
  author={Hans P. A. Van Dongen and Greg Maislin and Janet M Mullington and David F. Dinges},
  journal={Sleep},
  year={2003},
  volume={26 2},
  pages={
          117-26
        }
}
OBJECTIVES To inform the debate over whether human sleep can be chronically reduced without consequences, we conducted a dose-response chronic sleep restriction experiment in which waking neurobehavioral and sleep physiological functions were monitored and compared to those for total sleep deprivation. DESIGN The chronic sleep restriction experiment involved randomization to one of three sleep doses (4 h, 6 h, or 8 h time in bed per night), which were maintained for 14 consecutive days. The… 

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