The cultural evolution of emergent group-level traits

@article{Smaldino2014TheCE,
  title={The cultural evolution of emergent group-level traits},
  author={Paul E. Smaldino},
  journal={Behavioral and Brain Sciences},
  year={2014},
  volume={37},
  pages={243 - 254}
}
  • P. Smaldino
  • Published 1 June 2014
  • Medicine, Psychology
  • Behavioral and Brain Sciences
Abstract Many of the most important properties of human groups – including properties that may give one group an evolutionary advantage over another – are properly defined only at the level of group organization. Yet at present, most work on the evolution of culture has focused solely on the transmission of individual-level traits. I propose a conceptual extension of the theory of cultural evolution, particularly related to the evolutionary competition between cultural groups. The key concept… 

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