The costs of being male: are there sex-specific effects of uniparental mitochondrial inheritance?

@article{Beekman2014TheCO,
  title={The costs of being male: are there sex-specific effects of uniparental mitochondrial inheritance?},
  author={Madeleine Beekman and Damian K. Dowling and Duur K. Aanen},
  journal={Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences},
  year={2014},
  volume={369}
}
Eukaryotic cells typically contain numerous mitochondria, each with multiple copies of their own genome, the mtDNA. Uniparental transmission of mitochondria, usually via the mother, prevents the mixing of mtDNA from different individuals. While on the one hand, this should resolve the potential for selection for fast-replicating mtDNA variants that reduce organismal fitness, maternal inheritance will, in theory, come with another set of problems that are specifically relevant to males. Maternal… 
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