The costs of autotomy and regeneration in animals: a review and framework for future research

@article{Maginnis2006TheCO,
  title={The costs of autotomy and regeneration in animals: a review and framework for future research},
  author={T. Maginnis},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology},
  year={2006},
  volume={17},
  pages={857-872}
}
Many organisms have the ability to shed an appendage (autotomy) to escape a predator or fouled molting event. Despite its immediate advantage on survivorship, autotomy can have important consequences for locomotion, foraging, survivorship, and/or reproduction. Thus, regeneration is a way that animals alleviate some of the costs associated with losing an appendage. Like autotomy, however, appendage regeneration can have important consequences for a variety of aspects of fitness; in a wide range… Expand

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TLDR
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The phylogenetic history of regeneration in two groups where the trait has been well-studied: arthropods and reptiles is examined, finding that autotomy and regeneration were present at the base of the arthropod and reptile trees and that when autotomy is lost it does not re-evolve easily. Expand
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