The costs and benefits of frog chorusing behavior

@article{Ryan2004TheCA,
  title={The costs and benefits of frog chorusing behavior},
  author={Michael J. Ryan and Merlin D. Tuttle and Lucinda K. Taft},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2004},
  volume={8},
  pages={273-278}
}
Summary1.A number of predators, including a bat (Trachops cirrhosus), a frog (Leptodactylus pentadactylus), an opossum (Philander opossum), and a crab (Potamocarcinus richmondi), prey on the neotropical frog Physalaemus pustulosus, which calls in choruses on Barro Colorado Island, Panama.2.Predation rate (no. of frogs eaten/h of observation) and predation risk to individuals (predation rate/chorus size) were determined for choruses of various sizes. There was no correlation between chorus size… Expand

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