The cost of natural selection

@article{Haldane1957TheCO,
  title={The cost of natural selection},
  author={John Burdon Sanderson Haldane},
  journal={Journal of Genetics},
  year={1957},
  volume={55},
  pages={511-524}
}
  • J. Haldane
  • Published 1 December 1957
  • Biology
  • Journal of Genetics
SummaryUnless selection is very intense, the number of deaths needed to secure the substitution, by natural selection, of one gene for another at a locus, is independent of the intensity of selection. It is often about 30 times the number of organisms in a generation. It is suggested that, in horotelic evolution, the mean time taken for each gene substitution is . about 300 generations. This accords with the observed slowness of evolution. 

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  • 2010
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Genetics and the understanding of selection

  • L. Hurst
  • Biology
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  • 2009
How genetics is crucial for addressing all of these questions: genetics allowed the concept of natural selection to become viable, it contributed to the authors' understanding of the complexities of selection and it spurred the development of competing models of evolution.

One con the caus Genetic linkage and natural selection

It is plausible that spatial and temporal fluctuations in selection generate much more fitness variance, and hence selection for recombination, than can be explained by uniformly deleterious mutations or species-wide selective sweeps.
...

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