The cost of flight: a role in the Polistes dominulus invasion

@article{Weiner2011TheCO,
  title={The cost of flight: a role in the Polistes dominulus invasion},
  author={Susan A. Weiner and Katherine Noble and Christopher Upton and George Flynn and William A. Woods and Philip T B Starks},
  journal={Insectes Sociaux},
  year={2011},
  volume={59},
  pages={81-86}
}
Polistes dominulus is a primitively eusocial paper wasp from Mediterranean Europe that is invasive to North America. In Eastern North America, P. dominulus is in competition with P. fuscatus. One reason for the success of P. dominulus is that their colonies produce more reproductive offspring than P. fuscatus colonies. A partial explanation for this difference is that P. dominulus foundresses make more foraging trips in the pre-worker period, which likely helps them to rear workers more quickly… 
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TLDR
A review of this ongoing invasion of the European paper wasp Polistes dominulus into North America in terms of population genetic variation in P. dominulus, and data from comparative studies where the two species are sympatric and possible mechanisms contributing to the differences between them is reviewed.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
It is concluded that P. dominulus individuals demonstrate clear, albeit limited, thermoregulatory capacity.
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