The cost of deep sleep: Environmental influences on sleep regulation are greater for diurnal lemurs.

@article{Samson2018TheCO,
  title={The cost of deep sleep: Environmental influences on sleep regulation are greater for diurnal lemurs.},
  author={David R. Samson and Joe Bray and Charles L. Nunn},
  journal={American journal of physical anthropology},
  year={2018},
  volume={166 3},
  pages={
          578-589
        }
}
OBJECTIVES Primates spend almost half their lives asleep, yet we know little about how evolution has shaped variation in the duration or intensity of sleep (i.e., sleep regulation) across primate species. Our objective was to test hypotheses related to how sleeping site security influences sleep intensity in different lemur species. METHODS We used actigraphy and infrared videography to generate sleep measures in 100 individuals (males = 51, females = 49) of seven lemur species (genera… 

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