The cost of carnivory for Darlingtonia californica (Sarraceniaceae): evidence from relationships among leaf traits.

@article{Ellison2005TheCO,
  title={The cost of carnivory for Darlingtonia californica (Sarraceniaceae): evidence from relationships among leaf traits.},
  author={A. Ellison and E. Farnsworth},
  journal={American journal of botany},
  year={2005},
  volume={92 7},
  pages={
          1085-93
        }
}
Scaling relationships among photosynthetic rate, foliar nutrient concentration, and leaf mass per unit area (LMA) have been observed for a broad range of plants. Leaf traits of the carnivorous pitcher plant Darlingtonia californica, endemic to southern Oregon and northern California, USA, differ substantially from the predictions of these general scaling relationships; net photosynthetic rates of Darlingtonia are much lower than predicted by general scaling relationships given observed foliar… Expand
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