The cost effectiveness of naltrexone added to cognitive-behavioral therapy in the treatment of alcohol dependence.

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the comparative cost of treating alcohol dependence with either cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) alone or CBT combined with naltrexone (CBT+naltrexone). Two hundred ninety-eight outpatients dependent on alcohol who were consecutively treated for alcohol dependence participated in this study. One hundred seven (36%) patients received adjunctive pharmacotherapy (CBT+naltrexone). The Drug Abuse Treatment Cost Analysis Program was used to estimate treatment costs. Adjunctive pharmacotherapy (CBT+naltrexone) introduced an additional treatment cost and was 54% more expensive than CBT alone. When treatment abstinence rates (36.1% CBT; 62.6% CBT+naltrexone) were applied to cost effectiveness ratios, CBT+naltrexone demonstrated an advantage over CBT alone. There were no differences between groups on a preference-based health measure (SF-6D). In this treatment center, to achieve 100 abstainers over a 12-week program, 280 patients require CBT compared with 160 CBT+naltrexone. The dominant choice was CBT+naltrexone based on modest economic advantages and significant efficiencies in the numbers needed to treat.

DOI: 10.1080/10550880902772456

Cite this paper

@article{Walters2009TheCE, title={The cost effectiveness of naltrexone added to cognitive-behavioral therapy in the treatment of alcohol dependence.}, author={David Walters and Jason P. Connor and Gerald F. X. Feeney and Ross McD Young}, journal={Journal of addictive diseases}, year={2009}, volume={28 2}, pages={137-44} }