The cortical organization of speech processing

@article{Hickok2007TheCO,
  title={The cortical organization of speech processing},
  author={Gregory Hickok and David Poeppel},
  journal={Nature Reviews Neuroscience},
  year={2007},
  volume={8},
  pages={393-402}
}
Despite decades of research, the functional neuroanatomy of speech processing has been difficult to characterize. A major impediment to progress may have been the failure to consider task effects when mapping speech-related processing systems. We outline a dual-stream model of speech processing that remedies this situation. In this model, a ventral stream processes speech signals for comprehension, and a dorsal stream maps acoustic speech signals to frontal lobe articulatory networks. The model… 

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