The coracoscapular joint of neornithine birds—extensive homoplasy in a widely neglected articular surface of the avian pectoral girdle and its possible functional correlates

@article{Mayr2021TheCJ,
  title={The coracoscapular joint of neornithine birds—extensive homoplasy in a widely neglected articular surface of the avian pectoral girdle and its possible functional correlates},
  author={Gerald Mayr},
  journal={Zoomorphology},
  year={2021},
  volume={140},
  pages={217-228}
}
  • G. Mayr
  • Published 27 May 2021
  • Biology
  • Zoomorphology
A survey is given of the morphological variation of the coracoscapular joint of neornithine birds. In Mesozoic stem group representatives, the coracoid exhibits a deeply concave cotyla scapularis, which articulates with a globose tuberculum coracoideum of the scapula. This morphology is likely to be functionally related to the development of a powerful supracoracoideus muscle and the formation of a triosseal canal as a pulley for the tendon of this muscle. In neornithine birds, the coracoid… 
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