The control and function of agonism in avian broodmates

@article{Drummond2001TheCA,
  title={The control and function of agonism in avian broodmates},
  author={Hugh Drummond},
  journal={Advances in The Study of Behavior},
  year={2001},
  volume={30},
  pages={261-301}
}
  • H. Drummond
  • Published 2001
  • Biology, Psychology
  • Advances in The Study of Behavior
No reduction in aggression after loss of a broodmate: a test of the brood size hypothesis
TLDR
The results suggest that dominant booby chicks do not become less aggressive to each other after disappearance of their youngest broodmate and that this species does not show brood size dependent aggression.
WHY DO SOME SIBLINGS ATTACK EACH OTHER? COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF AGGRESSION IN AVIAN BROODS
TLDR
It is suggested that indirect feeding, long nestling periods, and small broods, possibly in combination with other factors, have tended to favor the evolution of aggressive broodmate competition.
Begging Versus Aggression in Avian Broodmate Competition
TLDR
Observations of boobies and diverse species suggest that aggression limits the effectiveness of begging by subordinate young by confining its timing, location or form.
Is obligate siblicidal aggression food sensitive?
TLDR
The less food an older nestling ingested, the more time it spent active and the greater its rate and absolute frequency of pushes, and the more often it expelled its nestmate, suggesting deficient food provision to older nestlings could precipitate siblicidal expulsion of broodmates.
Dominance in Vertebrate Broods and Litters
  • H. Drummond
  • Biology, Psychology
    The Quarterly Review of Biology
  • 2006
TLDR
An evolutionary framework in which the species‐typical dominance relationship is determined by feeding mode, confinement, cost of subordination, and capacity for individual recognition, can be extended to mammalian litters and account for the aggression‐submission and aggression‐resistance observed in distinct populations of spotted hyenas.
Is broodmate aggression really associated with direct feeding
TLDR
Neither the assumption nor either of the predictions of the FMH was supported and, if anything, senior broodmates were more aggressive early in the nestling period when feeding was indirect, casting doubt on the ultimate influence of feeding method on use of aggression and, especially, on the role of direct feeding as a proximate trigger for aggression.
Buffered Development: Resilience after Aggressive Subordination in Infancy
TLDR
Exercising dominance throughout infancy apparently does not fortify a chick for the future and may incur a long‐term cost, and suffering violent subordination throughout infancy has little or no prejudicial effect and may even steel a chicks for adult life.
Sibling competition in common tern Sterna hirundo chicks: underlying hormonal and behavioural patterns and mechanisms
TLDR
The results show that sibling competition poses limits on chick condition, at least in junior chicks, and underline the role of elevated C ORT levels as a response to connected energetic stress.
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References

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The Role of Brood Size in Regulating Egret Sibling Aggression
TLDR
It is proposed that species probably do best by relying on current food amount for the truncation of sibling fighting whenever that cue allows an accurate assessment of pending competition, with brood size used mainly as an alternative or backup system.
Does brood reduction provide nestling survivors with a food bonus?
TLDR
To test the assumption that parental deliveries of food remain constant, and to determine how brood reduction affected seniors, food deliveries to control and experimentally reduced broods of brown pelicans were compared.
Avian Brood Reduction and Parent-Offspring "Conflict"
TLDR
Model analysis revealed that both conflict and cooperation over brood size are possible ESSs, and parental fitness was diminished slightly by despotic allocation, but the risk of parent-offspring conflict was also diminished.
EVOLUTION OF OBLIGATE SIBLICIDE IN BOOBIES. 2: FOOD LIMITATION AND PARENT–OFFSPRING CONFLICT
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  • Biology
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TLDR
Estimates of inclusive fitness of chicks in experimental broods were higher than were those of control nestlings, a result inconsistent with the POC hypothesis that the siblicidal offspring's optimal brood size is one while the parents' optimum is greater than one.
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TLDR
It is concluded that food amount has little direct influence on fighting behavior in these birds, though it consistently influences chick survival, and the proximate effects of this ecological variable must be divorced from its ultimate role.
Dominance between booby nestlings involves winner and loser effects
TLDR
Although most subordinates consistently lost agonistic encounters during the first 10 days after pairing, the proportion of dominants that won decreased progressively until, by day 6, only about half of dominant chicks were winning.
The relative roles of hunger and size asymmetry in sibling aggression between nestling ospreys, Pandion haliaetus
TLDR
The tremendous variation in the level of sibling aggression observed between broods was inversely related to brood mass asymmetry but not to condition, suggesting that siblings adjusted the rate of aggression according to thelevel of competition within their broods.
The Role of Parents in Sibilicidal Brood Reduction of Two Booby Species
TLDR
Interspecific differences in nest shape that appear to contribute to early siblicide in Masked Boobies, but that suppress early siberian brood reduction in Blue-footed Booby are reported.
Effects of short-term hunger and competitive asymmetry on facultative aggression in nestling black guillemots Cepphus grylle
TLDR
The results provide the first evidence that short-term food shortage per se acts as an initial trigger for aggression and also show that the aggressive response is complicated by factors associated with hatching and laying order.
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