The contribution of recollection and familiarity to yes–no and forced-choice recognition tests in healthy subjects and amnesics

@article{Khoe2000TheCO,
  title={The contribution of recollection and familiarity to yes–no and forced-choice recognition tests in healthy subjects and amnesics},
  author={Wayne Khoe and Neal E. A. Kroll and Andrew P. Yonelinas and Ian G. Dobbins and Robert T. Knight},
  journal={Neuropsychologia},
  year={2000},
  volume={38},
  pages={1333-1341}
}

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