The contextual interference effect in applied settings

@article{Barreiros2007TheCI,
  title={The contextual interference effect in applied settings},
  author={Jo{\~a}o Barreiros and Teresa Figueiredo and M{\'a}rio Godinho},
  journal={European Physical Education Review},
  year={2007},
  volume={13},
  pages={195 - 208}
}
This paper analyses the research literature that approaches the contextual interference effect in applied settings. In contrast to the laboratory settings, in which high interference conditions depress acquisition and promote learning evaluated in retention and transfer tests, in applied settings most of the studies (60%) fail to observe positive effects after manipulation of the contextual interference. Some possible explanations for the fact are hypothesized regarding the characteristics of… 

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An Implicit Basis for the Retention Benefits of Random Practice
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The hypothesis of this study was that this increase in task difficulty during practice would be associated with a higher attention load during practice, and this hypothesis was supported; however, high contextual interference promoted only a transient increase in retention.
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