The concepts of ‘sameness’ and ‘difference’ in an insect

@article{Giurfa2001TheCO,
  title={The concepts of ‘sameness’ and ‘difference’ in an insect},
  author={Martin Giurfa and Shao-Wu Zhang and Arnim Jenett and Randolf Menzel and Mandyam V. Srinivasan},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2001},
  volume={410},
  pages={930-933}
}
Insects process and learn information flexibly to adapt to their environment. The honeybee Apis mellifera constitutes a traditional model for studying learning and memory at behavioural, cellular and molecular levels. Earlier studies focused on elementary associative and non-associative forms of learning determined by either olfactory conditioning of the proboscis extension reflex or the learning of visual stimuli in an operant context. However, research has indicated that bees are capable of… 
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