The composition and origin of the lunar crust: Constraints from central peaks and crustal thickness modeling

@article{Wieczorek2001TheCA,
  title={The composition and origin of the lunar crust: Constraints from central peaks and crustal thickness modeling},
  author={Mark A. Wieczorek and Maria T. Zuber},
  journal={Geophysical Research Letters},
  year={2001},
  volume={28}
}
Spectral‐reflectance data of lunar central peaks have revealed that the Moon's crust varies both laterally and vertically in composition. We correlate the depths of origin of materials that make up central peaks with a geophysically derived dual‐layered crustal thickness model and find that the peak compositions are consistent with this stratified model. Specifically, peaks composed exclusively of rocks containing more than 85% plagioclase (by volume) come from this model's upper crust, whereas… 

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