The complexity of the vocabulary of Bambara

@article{Culy1985TheCO,
  title={The complexity of the vocabulary of Bambara},
  author={Christopher Culy},
  journal={Linguistics and Philosophy},
  year={1985},
  volume={8},
  pages={345-351}
}
  • C. Culy
  • Published 1 August 1985
  • Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Philosophy
In this paper I look at the possibility of considering the vocabulary of a natural language as a sort of language itself. In particular, I study the weak generative capacity of the vocabulary of Bambara, and show that the vocabulary is not context free. This result has important ramifications for the theory of syntax of natural language. 

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