The complete mitochondrial DNA genome of an unknown hominin from southern Siberia

@article{Krause2010TheCM,
  title={The complete mitochondrial DNA genome of an unknown hominin from southern Siberia},
  author={Johannes Krause and Qiaomei Fu and Jeffrey Martin Good and Bence Viola and Michael V. Shunkov and Anatoli P. Derevianko and Svante P{\"a}{\"a}bo},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2010},
  volume={464},
  pages={894-897}
}
With the exception of Neanderthals, from which DNA sequences of numerous individuals have now been determined, the number and genetic relationships of other hominin lineages are largely unknown. Here we report a complete mitochondrial (mt) DNA sequence retrieved from a bone excavated in 2008 in Denisova Cave in the Altai Mountains in southern Siberia. It represents a hitherto unknown type of hominin mtDNA that shares a common ancestor with anatomically modern human and Neanderthal mtDNAs about… 
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