The coevolutionary arms race between Horsfield's Bronze-Cuckoos and Superb Fairy-wrens

@article{Langmore2010TheCA,
  title={The coevolutionary arms race between Horsfield's Bronze-Cuckoos and Superb Fairy-wrens},
  author={Naomi E. Langmore and Rebecca M. Kilner},
  journal={Emu - Austral Ornithology},
  year={2010},
  volume={110},
  pages={32 - 38}
}
Abstract Brood parasitism by cuckoos imposes high reproductive costs on hosts, selecting for the evolution of host defences. Cuckoos retaliate by evolving counter-adaptations to host defences, giving rise to a coevolutionary arms race between cuckoos and their hosts. Here we review the observational and experimental evidence for a coevolutionary arms race between Horsfield's Bronze-Cuckoos(Chalcites basalis) and Superb Fairy-wrens(Malurus cyaneus). We present evidence that the arms race has… 
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