The clinical microbiology laboratory and infection control: emerging pathogens, antimicrobial resistance, and new technology.

Abstract

The clinical microbiology laboratory is an essential component of an effective infection control program. Laboratory personnel have a broad range of technologies, from traditional methods of detecting and identifying organisms to modern molecular typing methods, that they can use to support and enhance the efforts of the infection control staff. If the infection control team applies these technologies appropriately, it can prevent problems and solve nosocomial mysteries efficiently. In this era of cost-containment, staff members in the laboratory and in the infection control program must work hard to communicate their unique and shared goals, needs, and problems. If the laboratory and infection control personnel cooperate and collaborate rather than compete, both programs will be successful and the patients and the hospital will benefit because the risk of nosocomial infections and the frequency of resistant organisms will be reduced.

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@article{Pfaller1997TheCM, title={The clinical microbiology laboratory and infection control: emerging pathogens, antimicrobial resistance, and new technology.}, author={Michael A. Pfaller and Loreen Adele Herwaldt}, journal={Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America}, year={1997}, volume={25 4}, pages={858-70} }