The clinical impact of bacterial biofilms

@article{Hiby2011TheCI,
  title={The clinical impact of bacterial biofilms},
  author={Niels H{\o}iby and Oana Ciofu and Helle Krogh Johansen and Zhi-jun Song and Claus E Moser and Peter {\O}strup Jensen and S{\o}ren Molin and Michael Givskov and Tim Tolker-Nielsen and Thomas Bjarnsholt},
  journal={International Journal of Oral Science},
  year={2011},
  volume={3},
  pages={55 - 65}
}
Bacteria survive in nature by forming biofilms on surfaces and probably most, if not all, bacteria (and fungi) are capable of forming biofilms. A biofilm is a structured consortium of bacteria embedded in a self‐produced polymer matrix consisting of polysaccharide, protein and extracellular DNA. Bacterial biofilms are resistant to antibiotics, disinfectant chemicals and to phagocytosis and other components of the innate and adaptive inflammatory defense system of the body. It is known, for… Expand
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