The chemical strategies used by Polistes nimphus social wasp usurpers (Hymenoptera Vespidae)

@article{Lorenzi2007TheCS,
  title={The chemical strategies used by Polistes nimphus social wasp usurpers (Hymenoptera Vespidae)},
  author={M. C. Lorenzi and M. Caldi and R. Cervo},
  journal={Biological Journal of The Linnean Society},
  year={2007},
  volume={91},
  pages={505-512}
}
Polistes foundresses can behave as facultative social parasites when, instead of founding their own nest, they usurp colonies of the same or a different species and temporary use the host workforce to raise their own brood. Conspecific usurpation appears to be common among Polistes wasps, but nothing is known about the mechanisms that these facultative social parasites use to have themselves accepted within usurped colonies. Using behavioural tests, we studied the chemical strategies employed… Expand
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