The changing assessments of John Snow's and William Farr's cholera studies

@article{Eyler2005TheCA,
  title={The changing assessments of John Snow's and William Farr's cholera studies},
  author={John M. Eyler},
  journal={Sozial- und Pr{\"a}ventivmedizin},
  year={2005},
  volume={46},
  pages={225-232}
}
  • J. Eyler
  • Published 2005
  • History, Medicine
  • Sozial- und Präventivmedizin
SummaryThis article describes the epidemiological studies of cholera by two major British investigators of the mid-nineteenth century, John Snow and William Farr, and it asks why the assessments of their results by contemporaries was the reverse of our assessment today. In the 1840s and 1850s Farr's work was considered definitive, while Snow's was regarded as ingenious but flawed. Although Snow's conclusions ran contrary to the exceptations of his contemporaries, the major reservations about… 
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Constructing vital statistics :
This paper describes the role of these two English statisticians in establishing mortality measurements as means of assessing the health of human populations. Key to their innovations was the uses
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TLDR
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